Fallujah, Chilcot and the right to silent protest.

Fallujah. First time round.2004

When Fallujah was attacked and bombed by US forces in 2004, I later joined a friend in standing outside the House of Commons on a sunny Sunday afternoon. Between us, we held a sheet on which was written in red paint the number of civilians killed during this first battle of Fallujah.

The number was something in the region of 600 people, all Iraqi, all civilians.

Our presence on the pavement was a silent witness to these deaths. No leaflets were handed out and I made no attempt to engage people in a discussion.

Nevertheless, at the end of the afternoon, I was charged under the newly passed Serious Organised Crime and Police Act.  http://bit.ly/29f4Xhg

This law was one of the more repressive Acts introduced during Tony Blair’s time as Prime Minister which sought to curb the individual’s right to protest.

You have to wonder what it was Blair feared that he had to go to such ridiculous measures to stop people speaking their minds.

Perhaps we’ll find the answer in the Chilcot Inquiry.

Advertisements

Leave a comment

Filed under Life, Syria, Uncategorized

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s